Call Us: (802) 888-8888

“Today’s Ethical Challenges and Solutions to Mental Health”

September 17, 2014

October 8th Public Forum Hosted by Copley Hospital

Morrisville – Caring for someone with a mental illness can be complex. Copley Hospital is pleased to announce a forum to discuss signs of depression, and talk about resources and interventions that are available to the community, family and friends. The October 8th forum features Joel Page, Lamoille County State’s Attorney; Heather Hobart Executive Director Lamoille Restorative Center and Michael Hartman, Behavioral Health Director, and local providers. A question and answer session will follow.

“Today’s Ethical Challenges and Solutions in Mental Health” will be held Wednesday, October 8th at 6:00pm at the Green Mountain Technical & Career Center in Hyde Park. The free seminar is a presentation of the Ethics Committee of the Copley Hospital Board of Trustees and is open to all members of the community. Registration is suggested by calling Louise Feldman at 888-8291 or email lfeldman@chsi.org.

About Copley Hospital Ethics Committee

The Ethics Committee is a standing committee of the Copley Hospital Board of Trustees. Physicians, nurses, clergy, administrators, trustees and interested community members serve on the committee. Its role is to help patients and families, physicians, and hospital staff be informed and supported when making difficult ethical health-related decisions. According to Janice Roy, a Copley Hospital Trustee and chair of the Ethics Committee, a patient, family member, physician or staff member may request a consultation with the Ethics Committee if they are struggling with a difficult decision for a loved one or patient.

The Ethics Committee does not make decisions; rather they act as advisors providing guidance and perspective on individual patient care. Roy explains that they listen and help provide more information and increase understanding among all involved. She provides the following examples of when an ethics consultation might be used:

  • Decisions about how long to continue major treatments for a patient who is doing poorly
  • Decisions on to withhold or withdraw life-staining treatment
  • Uncertainty regarding who should help with decisions for someone who is too ill to make his or her wishes known.

During an ethics consultation, a subcommittee of the Ethics Committee will meet with the individual requesting the consultation. The committee strives to hold consultations within 24 hours of the request. The entire process is completely confidential.